Books in Business: Expect to Win: 10 Proven Strategies for Thriving in the Workplace by Carla A. Harris

Publication Date: January 2009

Rating: 3 Stars

It is incredible when your real life banking job marries your passion of blogging, reading and writing. A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to witness Carla Harris speak personally. In this speech, Carla conveyed to us her “pearls” of wisdom, stories from her career on Wall Street and what she has learned over the years. So, at the end of her speech, when she mentioned her book and the chance to win it, I immediately jumped at the opportunity to bring my blog into my professional life. It has been a surreal experience witnessing an author, a successful woman in finance nonetheless, bring the fruits of her labor to us via her book, and then having the opportunity to feature said book on your blog, it has provided me the opportunity to bring my two loves full circle (my job and blogging).

To back up, Carla is a triumphant woman in finance. Currently, she is a Vice Chairman, Managing Director and Senior Client Advisor at Morgan Stanley. It is for this reason that she was brought in to speak to us, because in 2017 much of the banking I am exposed to is still largely men, and I can’t say it enough, representation matters. Seeing women in positions other women strive to be in is something men often take for granted within their own gender. Seeing women of color in leadership positions other women of color want, is even more empowering.

Have you ever just wanted to walk up to someone you idolize in the workplace and ask how they got to where they are today? What they’ve learned along the way? And what advice they’d give you, either as someone just starting out or as someone more matured in your career? This book is exactly that, from Carla’s perspective. Her “pearls” aren’t earth shattering, but rather have been reiterated different ways, many times before, but Carla puts a unique spin on this book by including her experiences and vividly defining trigger words such as “mentor” or “sponsor,” it is for this reason that Carla’s book is unique and set apart from the rest.

In Expect to Win: 10 Proven Strategies for Thriving in the Workplace, Carla took the approach of writing as if she is speaking right at you. In fact, her book closely mirrored her speech to us, making it so as the reading of this book was similar to simply watching Carla on the screen in front of me. The chapters within this book addressed topics such as authenticity, career goals/planning, being your own career champion (or captain as she phrased it), presenting yourself to others, mentor/sponsor/advisor relationships, using your voice, fear, networking, balance, mentality and spirituality. I took a unique approach to reading this book, given the business nature of it, and stopped each chapter to write down my thoughts on the specific chapter. Some of my thoughts I’ve shared below.

  1. Carla opens the book with a chapter on authenticity. This has become a “hot topic” right now as we continue to break down some of the age-old mentalities that work should be kept separate from home. I cannot help but agree with this statement from a balance perspective, if you are changing who you are for work, to keep those two work/home separate, how exhausting it can be. Throughout my MBA program we constantly came back to this topic. The culture of your organization must allow you the ability to bring your authentic self from home to work, if the culture does not support this there is a culture somewhere out there that will, it is up to you to find it.
  2. One chapter dealt with the topic of perception, how others perceive you and how to steer this perception. This topic is pretty common. Often one hears lectures telling people how to dress or how to make a great first impression, and while it is true your outer appearance affects how people judge you, Carla takes it a step further by looking deeper and providing some solutions. What messages can you be sending to others? You want to be tough, drop the word “tough” in sentences, she even discussed finding adjectives to align your real self with your organization, and then using those adjectives to help people associate them with you. Carla discusses that it is never too late to change people’s perceptions of you, even going so far as to indicate she was successful in doing so five to six years into her own career at Morgan Stanley.
  3. The last thing that really stuck out to me was Carla’s chapter on balance. Work/Life Balance is another trigger word currently being thrown around in many organizations and cultures. It is one of those concepts that escapes many, but remains important to all. I wholeheartedly agree that when you lack balance your day becomes a function of someone else’s day. For example, one does not have good balance when they allow a missed deal to ruin their entire week and follow them home. Finding passions elsewhere whether via volunteering, hobbies, etc. is important, but being aware enough to realize when I, personally, am out of balance because of “work fails” is where I need to be better. Work fails should not translate into life fails and I often struggle with this myself, needing constant reminding. Although, to that point, prior to reading this chapter if someone had come up to me and asked if I had good work/life balance I would have considered myself successful as I don’t work while at home and I never answer email off hours, but clearly I have work to do as evidenced after reading this chapter, as my work failures can sometimes translate and show in the attitude I display at home.

Overall, I found this book was geared toward a niche market, financial professionals. The “lingo” Carla used required a level of financial understanding and the examples provided were all from within the financial industry. However, the shear factor that set this book apart from other business-minded books was the financial setting and financial experiences, as they related to Carla. It is for this reason I enjoyed the book, but for this same reason a broader audience may not.

*Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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Audiobooks & A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

First Published in 1929

Admittedly, I do not listen to audiobooks. Often, people recommend audiobooks, and given my 40 minute one way, daily commute to work, audiobooks would seem like a great solution to fill my drive time, however I have not yet picked one up, until now. My dad, whom has a similar commute, swears by audiobooks. Coworkers, with several children of their own, constantly recommend audiobooks they’ve finished while mowing their lawn or catching up on menial work. Regardless, I have avoided popping in an audio CD for many years.   So, when a long three day weekend, traveling to Chicago presented itself, I decided to check out this month’s Book Club book as an audiobook, A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway.

BIG MISTAKE! First of all, I may be a millennial by age, but I am a retired, senior citizen in all respects. For starters, I count down the days (years, more accurately) until I am eligible for independent living facilities, I mean they are dorm rooms with a minimum age limit of 55-65, what’s not to love about them!! I am almost ALWAYS in bed by 9:30 so I can get a full night rest and I CRAVE paper books! Secondly, and this fits right up there in millennial stereotypes, I cannot sit still listening to something that long. I am constantly fiddling with my hands, playing on my phone or finding ANYTHING else to do but listen quietly. This audiobook proved no different. High functioning, attention deficit may more accurately describe my personality most days.

Regardless, I did make it through all eight CD’s of Ernest Hemingway’s classic. Typically, I am not drawn toward “men in war” books, especially not ones from earlier wars, and this remained true of this book. I found myself more fascinated by Frederick Henry and Catherine Barkley’s relationship than any of Hemingway’s war “fluff.” In fact, during Lieutenant Henry’s retreat I just keep asking when Catherine was going to be back. One notable opinion of this book was the ending, I was mad with how it ended but understood why it was cut off as it was. I loved that it brought these irritated emotions out of me. Although, as a disclaimer, my irritation with the ending was probably exaggerated further because I’d just suffered through MANY hours of an audio recording just to get to that finale.

Ultimately though, after experiencing an audiobook for the first time in many years, I think I will stick to my paperback/kindle books. When I am forced to read the words on the page I am much more apt to retain what is happening and connect more deeply with the story. Given my easily distracted nature and attention deficit throughout this audio recording, I did not feel it would be fair to give a starred rating of this book.

Four Reviews: Goliath Gets Up, In the Strictest Confidence, Sister Christian – Genesis & Lie to Me (Between the Sheets #2)

Goliath Gets Up by Starbuck O’Dwyer

Publication Date: July 15th, 2011

Rating: 1 ¼ Stars

Goliath Gets Up reads like a male dominated sitcom on TV, and not the family channels. While usually these types of TV shows peak my interest (even if I only last a few episodes), it did not translate into the type of reading I enjoyed. However, regardless of whether I enjoyed the reading or not, the author has serious writing talent that could probably translate into that of a screenwriter for said TV show. But, as the reader of a book written in this format, it seemed jumpy and sporadic. It took a few paragraphs of each chapter to get my bearings on the setting and narrative for said chapter.

This book was funny, if not random, and comprised of a story of “Dragon” (yes this is what a grown, 40-year-old man goes by) wanting to make a mark somewhere in his life, ultimately deciding that going over a waterfall is his way to make that mark. The target audience for this read is certainly male. There was a lot of dry, dull humor throughout as I pictured the book with the cast of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, aged a few years.

That being said, I have not given up on this author. I hope to eventually have the opportunity to read some of his other books, including How to Raise a Good Kid and its sequel High School Dance, as the humor and talent is definitely there.

*Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by LibraryThing.


In the Strictest Confidence by K. Britt-Badman

Publication Date: April 4th, 2016

Rating: 3 ¼ Stars

Frankie, is a divorced mother of two who begins a new job as the councilor of ASF Technologies. This book weaves us through the timeline of each of her ASF Technology patients, over the course of their six weeks of sessions, as she begins to experience frightening things in her home life. As if this isn’t an interesting enough plot the author adds diversity as Frankie’s sisters, and one of her patients, are profoundly deaf.

I loved how author, K. Britt-Badman, laid out this book. The timeline is incredibly easy to follow as we follow Frankie through each of her counseling sessions, week one through six. While the book was seemingly predictable it was extremely engaging and captivated my attention throughout. I found myself wanting to keep reading in all my free moments to see what would happen to Frankie next, as well as, what her patients would confide in her in at their next session.

Ultimately, while this book is enthralling as a standalone novel, I am reminded it is the first book in the series, and as such, I look forward to reading the next book, hopefully coming out soon.

*Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by LibraryThing.


Sister Christian – Genesis by Lisa Beth Darling

Publication Date: November 23rd, 2014

Rating: 4 Stars

I did not expect myself to enjoy this book as much as I did. I am not typically a fan of books within a series, as I feel like it commits me to read the series to the end, but this was a series I could fall for.

While Genesis is book one in the series it opens by introducing us to Dr. Richard Mason’s familial history, including his treacherous relationship with his military father and his focus on being the best at everything. Soon after starting the book, the author throws Hannah Rice into our lives. Hannah is the sister Dr. Mason was unaware of having and, to complicate matters more, Dr. Mason is her new trustee as their “father” recently passed. This “father” was not the father Dr. Mason grew up knowing as his whole life is ripped apart grasping his new caretaking responsibilities while realizing his biological father wasn’t who he thought.

This book reads like an episode of House, complete with Richard Mason, a doctor with a sharp tongue, cane and addiction to pain killers (seriously straight out of the TV Show House). Given my own background, raised with a family very involved in the medical profession, I loved that the author gave us glimpses of Hannah’s internal frustration as the doctors dug to unravel her diagnoses’ past. While this book certainly holds its own as a standalone novel, I hope the author spends more time in future books providing us previews of Hannah’s life, memories and path into Richard Mason’s life, as the remaining books in the series have since been released.

*Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by LibraryThing.


Lie to Me (Between the Sheets #2) by Melinda Di Lorenzo

Publication Date: September 18th, 2017

Rating: 2 ¼ Stars

Why I Chose This Book: After thoroughly enjoying The Follow by Eliza David I was looking for another bad boy romance, newly released felon Derek Stone certainly fit this bill. I found this book also offered a unique “bad girl” scenario as well though, as journalist, Audrey, lies about her identity to get an exclusive story on said bad boy. However, this is where the uniqueness ended.

Why I Disliked This Book: I found the plot was REACHING in some instances to create something that wasn’t there. For instance, some of the “signs” Derek and Audrey weren’t supposed to be together was a squirrel jumping through the window perfectly destroying their kiss and employment contract. Another “sign” was Audrey accidently turning on the dishwasher and destroying the contract she’d hidden in there. These “signs” seemed to be a bit farfetched and distracted from the chemistry between the two. Accompanying these farfetched “signs” was the phrase “Audreying it up,” meaning Audrey somehow ruins a good thing she has going. At one point Audrey, “Audrey’d it up,” when she slipped on the tub and SOMEHOW her phone took naked pictures of her falling and sent them to Derek. I have NEVER heard of such a thing accidentally happening so perfectly and somehow being the cherry on top of keeping Audrey and Derek’s relationship red hot.

Ultimately, while the storyline had all the intrigue, the scenes building on Audrey and Derek’s chemistry were rather implausible.

*Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by LibraryThing.

Two Reviews: Cashed Out by Michel H. Rubin & The French Girl by Lexie Elliott

Cashed Out by Michael H. Rubin

Publication Date: August 15th, 2017

Stars: 3 Stars

Cashed Out is about a washed up lawyer, Schex, who thinks his luck has changed when a well-known business guru, G.G., knocks on his door requesting his legal assistance. As his lawyer, G.G. asks Schex to secretly hold on to over $4 million on his behalf…days later the business man, G.G., is found dead.

Why I Chose This Book: I was looking for a refreshing, murder read. I don’t often read books revolving around the legal field and I wanted something simple, easy to follow from an author I’d not yet read. Cashed Out certainly fit that bill. It also offered me an escape to Louisiana, a state I’d only heard of, rather than visited personally.

Why I liked this book: Cashed Out provided just enough crime and drama to keep a reader hooked, while not swamping them down in too many twists they lose track of the mystery and thrill. I enjoyed that it touched on color and racial disparity while addressing corporate greed and the effects on low-income neighborhoods and inequalities present.

Why I disliked this book: Toward the end of the book, as the plot begins to nicely wrap up, the Micelli family and all the friends, ties, and links begun to get confusing. The back story on this family was not quite fully developed, making the addition of all these characters and name mentions a bit hard to keep track of, especially when they begin to appear in the final chapters of the book, rather than developed throughout.

*Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by Fiery Seas Publishing in return for an honest review.


The French Girl by Lexie Elliott

Publication Date: February 20th, 2018

Stars: 4 ¼ Stars

While this book does not arrive on shelves until February 2018, I was drawn to it as I’d recently read The Lying Game by Ruth Ware. After reading The French Girl by Lexie Elliott, dare I say I enjoyed it more so than Ruth Ware’s latest? While the plots remained relatively related: old friends re-unite as a murder investigation from a years old murder ignites, a murder in which they were closely tied, if not guilty of. Author, Lexie Elliott, did a more outstanding job capturing the reader in suspense. Rather than trying to guess “whodunit” I was enjoying the characters unravel.

As I compare this book to Ruth Ware’s The Lying Game, The French Girl provided more underlying love interests and romantic connections between the characters which only served to further capture the reader’s interests. Author, Lexie Elliott, sucks you in and holds on as she navigates the reader eloquently through the twisting connections of each of the book’s characters. In fact, this book allowed me to connect with SEVERAL characters at once, never feeling confused or scrambling to remember who was who.

My one dislike was the unsatisfying ending. While the finale was certainly plausible, and more than realistic, it left me mad. I was hoping for a conclusion MORE neatly wrapped in a bow, but nonetheless it is a great, worthy read.

*Disclaimer: This book was provide to me by Berkley Books via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

The beauty of The Heart’s Invisible Furies was found in the characters John Boyne created, and while this book could have easily been non-fiction, given the story line and historical accuracy, the coincidence in which the characters continued to overlap pulled this book into the genre of fiction.

Publication Date: August 22nd, 2017

Rating: 4.80 Stars

Why I Chose This Book: I kept seeing this book pop up on the many book sites I subscribe to, as well as front and center on many bookseller’s physical shelves. The author, John Boyne, had great success with another of his works, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a book I have not read myself but a movie I enjoyed nonetheless. I will admit I was not quite ready for the sheer honesty and pain that this book portrayed as it followed a homosexual man, Cyril, born in Ireland, over the course of 70 years. I also worried about how the author would keep us engaged over nearly 600 pages of text. Turns out, I had nothing to worry about.

Why I Loved This Book: As an Irish Catholic myself (my great-great grandparents immigrated to America) the brutally honest portrayal of the country/religion over the course of 70 years was painful to stomach, but important all the same. This book spanned from 1945 to 2015, and throughout, Ireland refused to admit any homosexuals lived within the country. People, including several of the characters followed, were killed over their sexuality or beaten within an inch of their lives. Unwed women were looked upon in shame and called whores by the Catholic Church. The stigma towards AIDS was addressed, and even, in 2015, the author pointed out that family members STILL felt the need to look in another direction when two men kissed.

The beauty of The Heart’s Invisible Furies was found in the characters John Boyne created, and while this book could have easily been non-fiction, given the story line and historical accuracy, the coincidence in which the characters continued to overlap pulled this book into the genre of fiction. The overlapping of characters, however, is what caused the reader to experience continuous engagement over the course of nearly 600 pages of text as each character was inserted with such purpose that continued to unravel itself over the course of Cyril’s life.

In 2017 America, I found this book to be so important and incredibly relevant. It was hard not to draw similar lines in time between what I know of American history and how Ireland was portrayed, and many, if not all, of the lines drawn were not of a favorable light. We, as a human race, have a long way to go in FULLY accepting ALL sexualities, minorities, genders and others “not like ourselves.” It often seems like such an easy concept to “love thy neighbor,” but we still have much work to do in ACTUALLY embracing this.

*Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review.

From Book to Small Screen: The Sinner by Petra Hammesfahr

Publication Date: July 25th, 2017 (first edition published in 1999)

Stars: 1 ¾

USA Network used to have all the best shows on TV. Shows like Psych, Monk and White Collar dominated my week’s viewing schedule, so when I saw that they were releasing a network original show, The Sinner, based on an international best-selling novel I HAD TO READ IT!

The Sinner is a psychological thriller about an otherwise boring married woman, Cora Bender. One day Cora and her family go to the beach. Cora is determined to kill herself in that water that day, but ends up killing a “stranger” instead. While she never denies responsibility for killing the man on the beach, her motive for killing him remains fuzzy throughout. The reader is taken through Cora’s troubling childhood in flashes of memory, and like the investigating detectives, are led to believe the many lies Cora spins.

Even after finishing this novel, I still do not have a complete grasp on what really went through Cora’s mind, ultimately leading her to do what she did that day on the beach. I kept thinking throughout that maybe my struggle to grasp what was happening was simply “lost in translation” confusion, as it would seem, I am not unique in my difficulties to fully comprehend what was happening. Dare I say, this may be a case where a TV show or movie is more enjoyable than the actual book? The TV show allows a visual for the watcher to track the story, understand when “flashbacks” are occurring and walk alongside the detective in uncovering lies.

You can stream the show directly from USA Network. In fact I have enjoyed watching along since finishing this book. I have missed Jessica Biel on the big screen and she does a rather incredible job of portraying such a disturbed character. While I haven’t finished all the episodes, there are certainly glaring differences in the book and the TV show, least of which is the name change from Cora Bender to Cora Tannetti, but after my own difficulties in reading this book these differences are to be expected and add drams/excitement to the story.

*Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by Penguin Books in exchange for an honest review.

Iowa City Book Festival 2017: Among the Living and the Dead by Inara Verzemnieks

Admittedly, the coolest thing about reading is the ability to connect. Connect to other readers online, in your book club or in your local community. Even cooler, the ability to meet the author of books.  I’d say this ranks up there with meeting famous movie stars, yeah? Either way, as residents of Iowa City we are incredibly fortunate. While Iowa City, IA may not have the population size of Chicago or New York we maintain some incredibly prestigious literary honors. One of which is our world renowned University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop.  The other is our designation as a UNESCO City of Literature.  Both of which allow us the ability to attract some pretty amazing authors, writers and other members of the literary community.

This year, on October 8-15th, Iowa City will host their annual Book Festival. You can check out the official schedule here.  This event brings out renowned authors for book readings, panels, galas, speakers and awards.

As we build up to the beginning of this festival, I wanted to highlight three local authors that will be attending the Iowa City Book Festival this year.  The last author I am highlighting is Inara Verzemnieks, whom recently published a memoir: Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Road of Europe.

Check back as I will be reviewing additional author spotlights in the weeks approaching the book festival:

  1. Crossing A Doctor Soldier’s Story by Jon Kerstetter
  2. The Follow by Eliza David
  3. Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe by Inara Verzemnieks

Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe by Inara Verzemnieks

Rating: 4 ½ Stars Publication Date: July 11th, 2017

Author, Inara Verzemnieks, raised by her grandparents, travels back to Latvia to unravel their past. Through the turmoil of WWII, to refugees in America, this memoir reads more like a vivid story than a non-fiction.

Inara, a graduate of the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program, currently teaches at the University of Iowa and resides in Iowa City. Inara has won several awards for her writing, including a creative nonfiction award. I highlight this creative nonfiction award because I think it is the perfect description of how pure, vivid and immense Among the Living and the Dead is.

This book reads like you are walking alongside Livija, Inara’s grandmother, as she fled WWII. Ultimately, the book unravels as Inara visits her great aunt (Livija’s sister), Ausma in Latvia. The author frames the memoir so that she is both in the present while visiting the past, not unlike that of a traditional fiction storyline, which makes this book so enjoyable. This style of writing, coupled with the author’s incredible talent for words, had me re-reading paragraphs just to soak in each intensely well-written passage. The author clearly spent so much time ensuring each detail was perfectly laid out for the reader, making it incredibly easy to visualize each scene, despite never having stepped foot in Latvia or studied it’s culture.

I admit while I am a typical “sucker” for WWII-based novels, this book took me on an unexpected journey through the author’s family’s connection to this time period as she simultaneous walked with us through the present and her journey home.

Stop by the Iowa City Book Festival Saturday, October 14th at 11:30AM: Author, Inara Verzemnieks, will be reading from her memoir at the Iowa City Public Library (123 S. Linn St, Iowa City, IA).

*Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by publisher, W.W. Norton Company, in exchange for an honest review.

Iowa City Book Festival 2017: The Follow by Eliza David

Admittedly, the coolest thing about reading is the ability to connect. Connect to other readers online, in your book club or in your local community. Even cooler, the ability to meet the author of books.  I’d say this ranks up there with meeting famous movie stars, yeah? Either way, as residents of Iowa City we are incredibly fortunate. While Iowa City, IA may not have the population size of Chicago or New York we maintain some incredibly prestigious literary honors. One of which is our world renowned University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop.  The other is our designation as a UNESCO City of Literature.  Both of which allow us the ability to attract some pretty amazing authors, writers and other members of the literary community.

This year, on October 8-15th, Iowa City will host their annual Book Festival. You can check out the official schedule here.  This event brings out renowned authors for book readings, panels, galas, speakers and awards.

As we build up to the beginning of this festival, I wanted to highlight three local authors that will be attending the Iowa City Book Festival this year.  The first author is Jon Kerstetter, whom recently published his memoir: Crossings A Doctor Soldier’s Story.

Check back as I will be reviewing additional author spotlights in the weeks approaching the book festival:

  1. Crossing A Doctor Soldier’s Story by Jon Kerstetter
  2. The Follow by Eliza David
  3. Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe by Inara Verzemnieks

The Follow by Eliza David

Eliza, while born and raised in Chicago, currently resides in Iowa City. She has authored 10 books, according to Goodreads, with several more currently in the works. You can visit her website here to see what she is currently working on. On July 7th, Eliza released The Follow, which I chose to review. However, currently the first novel in her popular Cougarette Series is available free on Amazon Kindle, head over a pick up a copy.

Rating: 4 ¼ Stars

Publication Date: July 7th, 2017

In The Follow, Eliza shows us her seemingly effortless ability to switch between two relatively differing characters, King Smith a popular R&B singer with a more relaxed way of speaking and Shauna McIntyre a New York social media manager, newly hired and working to be successful in her role. Of course, King falls for Shauna despite her best efforts to remain professional and author, Eliza, shows off her comfort zone of navigating us through King and Shauna’s romantic frustrations.

Eliza does a great job capturing the essence of both personalities. Shauna, a hard working, come-from-nothing business woman, and King, a rich and famous celebrity as a result of his outstanding singing career (and good looks). As always, I enjoyed the seemingly “insider” look at celebrity lives. The necessity of maintaining fans, and being active in social media, while avoiding crazed fans and navigating a personal life. This book was an enjoyable read as it felt like one easy to follow dialogue.

The only frustration I had was the timeline. This book kicks off with Shauna leaving King’s apartment without saying good-bye as a result of this big, public kiss. Then we are taken back to “Three Months Earlier.” As the reader works their way through the chapters, there is no big, suspenseful moment that causes one to really realize “oh that was the big kiss from the beginning.” In fact, if the book hadn’t again replayed Shauna leaving without saying good-bye I wouldn’t have even realized we had come to the three month mark the book kicked off with. While this did not take away from the overall story, it did cause me hesitation of “was that the big exit from the beginning?”

Ultimately though, this book is more than worth your time. It may definitely be the spark that causes me to hop on the romance, easy-read bandwagon and I hope to circle back to reading Eliza David’s Cougarette Series in the near future. Seriously, go download Eliza’s free book on Amazon and see her talents for yourself.

Stop by the Iowa City Book Festival Saturday, October 14th from 10AM-4PM: Author, Eliza David, has a booth at the Book Fair in the Pedestrian Mall (201 Dubuque St., Iowa City, IA 52240). 

*Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by author, Eliza David, in exchange for an honest review.